Category Archives: Utah estate planning tax deductible

Utah estate planning tax deductible

Logan Cache Co. UT c corporation estate planning

Estate Planning - Why Should I Care?

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An estate plan is a document consisting of multiple trivial elements such as the living will or healthcare proxy or also known as medical power of attorney and assignment of power of attorney. Some people also include trust into their wills. Once you merge all these things together, you have to get it certified under the legal laws of both the federal and state governments. Basically everyone needs to have a will, to inform the world where you wish to allocate your assets to after you leave the world. In fact, it is the best way to consign guardians for your children.

Those dying without a proper estate planning, having no will to display upon their deaths are known to be dying intestate. However, this implies that your heirs need to struggle through several legal procedures in order to take over the assets. Having a trust does not guarantee the ownership transfer; it is insufficient because you still need a will to be in charge of your trust to inherit them to your beneficiaries. In addition, it is advisable that you discuss the plan with your children to avoid future discord, especially if you know your heirs may come in strong disagreement with one another.

To begin with your estate plan, you have to garner all appropriate information such as insurance policies, investments, real estate or business interests, financial condition, and any retirement savings. Then ponder to yourself several questions like who you wish to assign to the job of handling your financial affairs if you happen to be incapacitated. Then consider whom you intend to inherit your assets to and give thoughts into plotting the responsibility of your medical decisions should you be bedridden and unconscious.

Some people think that having infinite amount of money indicates a good estate planning but this is not always the case. Leaving all your properties and cash to your spouse does not imply it will be exempted from estate tax because you will instead increase his or her taxable estate. Subsequently, if your spouse leaves the money to your children upon his or her death, they will end up paying higher estate taxes. At all cases, having a will is the best item to solve all hassles.

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Do you want a Free Initial Consultation with an Estate Planning Lawyer?

Call 1-800-564-2707 today.

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American Fork Utah Co. UT 3 main purposes of estate planning

Estate Planning - Do You Need an Estate Plan?

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Appropriate estate planning can only be possible with proper appreciation of the major aspects involved in personal finance management process. Efficient estate planning attorney makes it a point realizing these aspects perfectly while making the plan.

Appropriate estate planning involves understanding various aspects of personal finance management well. Multiple aspects of such financial management are involved in the estate planning process. An efficient attorney therefore will always look at these aspects before preparing the estate management. People who are looking for inheritance, insurance and property transfer managements with efficiency will find understanding these aspects extremely useful for the purpose of preparing an all comprehensive estate planning.

Setting goals is extremely essential for preparing the perfect plan. Without the goals clearly determined it may not be possible to prepare plan that would meet all the requirements of the client. Retirement plans are examples of such goal setting. One could plan buying a house for residence after retirement at 25% of the gross income while keeping the residual portion of the income away for future investments, maintenance of the family, and other pursuits. People who are concerned with setting up multiple goals at one time may obtain the assistance of professional expert trust planning attorney that would balance the financial planning with goals set by the client for benefit optimization.

Goals that the client set up for achievement could either be long or short term. In any case setting such financial goals help direct planning. Processes like these involve adequate assessment of the financial and all other aspects of the estate and resources of the estate owner. Experienced and professional estate planning attorney would take care to prepare simplified versions of all the financial statements and legal documents so that there is no room for any confusion in the minds of the clients involved. Ordinarily balance sheets and income statements would be a couple of financial documents that helps the proper assessment of the estate to be planned.

Despite best goal setting and near perfect assessments by the estate lawyer proficient in these deals, best results could only accrue with perfect execution of the plans. One has to be careful about it.

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Do you want a Free Initial Consultation with an Estate Planning Lawyer?

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Pepperwood Sandy Utah estate planning videos

Estate Planning Overview, 101

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Estate Planning is not something that everyone wants to think about.  But it's an important thing to consider if you have a significant amount of property or wealth.  Even if you only have a small amount of wealth, you want to make sure that if you pass on, your property goes to the right people in your life.

Without the proper planning this may not happen.  Let's say for example you have no children and have yet to be married.  Let's say also that you spend all of your time working with a children's charity, and that if you did pass on you would want your money to go to this group. 

Without the proper planning, your money could go to your closest surviving family member.  This could be a sister that you don't get along with or a cousin you never knew.  If you know where you want your money to go, then estate planning should be a top priority. 

Nobody likes to think about death.  When you start to think about estate planning, you start to think about how you might die.  It's a sad thing to think about for many people.  But you should try your best to stay strong so that those that you love can get what you would've wanted them to have.

Another way to approach the issue is to do it with an experienced company.  Estate planning companies with experience dealing with this sort of thing can make the process much easier.  They know it's hard to think about these matters, so they make the questioning process as brief as possible for you.  Working with a professional in the field will make the whole process much easier.

You can do some shopping around to find the right company.  Your estate planning choices are some of the most important choices you will have to make in your lifetime.  You want to make sure that you choose the right company to handle them.

It is important to note that the estate planning process doesn't have to take a long time.  You generally know how you would like things to be worked out before you begin the process.  Your estate planner will just help to make your words legally binding, and remind you of issues you might have forgotten.

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Do you want a Free Initial Consultation with an Estate Planning Lawyer?

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Annabella Sevier County Utah a guide to estate planning

Estate Planning Issues During and After Divorce

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An estate plan is a document consisting of multiple trivial elements such as the living will or healthcare proxy or also known as medical power of attorney and assignment of power of attorney. Some people also include trust into their wills. Once you merge all these things together, you have to get it certified under the legal laws of both the federal and state governments. Basically everyone needs to have a will, to inform the world where you wish to allocate your assets to after you leave the world. In fact, it is the best way to consign guardians for your children.

Those dying without a proper estate planning, having no will to display upon their deaths are known to be dying intestate. However, this implies that your heirs need to struggle through several legal procedures in order to take over the assets. Having a trust does not guarantee the ownership transfer; it is insufficient because you still need a will to be in charge of your trust to inherit them to your beneficiaries. In addition, it is advisable that you discuss the plan with your children to avoid future discord, especially if you know your heirs may come in strong disagreement with one another.

To begin with your estate plan, you have to garner all appropriate information such as insurance policies, investments, real estate or business interests, financial condition, and any retirement savings. Then ponder to yourself several questions like who you wish to assign to the job of handling your financial affairs if you happen to be incapacitated. Then consider whom you intend to inherit your assets to and give thoughts into plotting the responsibility of your medical decisions should you be bedridden and unconscious.

Some people think that having infinite amount of money indicates a good estate planning but this is not always the case. Leaving all your properties and cash to your spouse does not imply it will be exempted from estate tax because you will instead increase his or her taxable estate. Subsequently, if your spouse leaves the money to your children upon his or her death, they will end up paying higher estate taxes. At all cases, having a will is the best item to solve all hassles.

Go Forward

Do you want a Free Initial Consultation with an Estate Planning Lawyer?

Call 1-800-564-2707 today.

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Big Water Kane County Utah power estate planning

Levels of Estate Planning

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There are numerous estate planning issues that arise during a separation or divorce. If you're considering divorce, make sure you've adequately addressed these issues and avoid significant consequences.

The first issue is to immediately revoke any powers of attorney that grant your spouse powers over your health care or financial decisions. If you do not revoke these powers of attorney, your ex-spouse will remain your agent despite your divorce. Just imagine your ex-spouse making your health care decisions or continuing to have access to your financial accounts even after your divorce.

If you do not have a health care power of attorney or financial power of attorney, or after you revoke your existing power of attorney, you should create a new one. You may do this before, during, or after your divorce. If your divorce is pending, you probably do not want your soon to be ex-spouse having any type of decision making power over you or your assets. However, if you do not appoint someone else, your spouse will likely serve as the "default" agent if one is needed.

The next thing to consider is your Will. If you already have a Will, revise it. Chances are that your current Will provides for everything to go to your spouse. Once your divorce is final, any bequests to your spouse are nullified. Still, if you do not change your Will, such bequests will be granted if you die before your divorce is final. You cannot completely disinherit your spouse through a Will because State law provides for minimum amounts to a spouse, which is called "taking against the Will". Still you can limit what your spouse receives to the statutory amounts.

Also, there is a good chance that your spouse is named as your Personal Representative (or Executor). Even after your divorce is final, this designation will remain valid. Finally, any bequests made to in-laws will remain valid despite your divorce. Often there is a provision in Wills that provides that in the event your spouse does not survive you and there are no other beneficiaries under your Will, your assets are divided evenly between your heirs at law and your spouse's heirs at law. So, you may have a bequest to your in-laws and not even realize it.

You may also want to consider appointing a guardian for any minor children. In almost all cases, your spouse will continue to have parental rights and will receive full custody of your children upon your death. However, if there is a valid reason, such as abuse or drug addiction, why your spouse should not receive custody you should identify those reasons in your Will and name the person(s) you wish to have custody. Also, if your ex-spouse predeceases you, your Will should control who receives custody.

Also, you should establish a trust through your Will (called a testamentary trust) to control assets left to minor or disabled children. That way, you can decide who makes the decisions over those assets until your children are old enough to receive them outright. If you do not establish a trust and appoint a trustee, your ex-spouse will likely have control over any assets left to your children. And, although the assets are supposed to be used for the children's benefit, there is no practical way of controlling or checking that that is what really happens.

You should also consider a Revocable Trust. If you have one already, revise it to remove powers and gifts given to ex-spouse. Unlike a Will, any gifts given to an ex-spouse through a trust remain valid despite your divorce. Likewise, if your spouse is named as your successor trustee, that appointment remains valid despite your divorce.

There is also a benefit to having a Revocable Trust rather than a Will. In some states, you can completely disinherit a spouse through a revocable trust. The reasoning is that the statutes that grant your spouse a minimum amount of your assets only apply to your probate estate. However, any assets that are placed in trust during your lifetime are not subject to probate. Therefore, if you title all of your individual assets in your trust, you can keep your spouse from receiving anything of yours even if you die before your divorce is final. It can also serve as an ongoing trust after your death to hold assets for your children without your spouse having control or decision making ability.

Additionally, you should review and update any beneficiary designations on life insurance policies, retirement plans, etc. You may not be able to make some of these changes until your divorce is final. For most retirement accounts, your spouse has to sign an authorization for you to appoint someone else as your beneficiary. You may also be prohibited by the court from making changes while your divorce is pending. Just don't forget to make the changes once your divorce is final.

Finally, you should re-title any assets held jointly with your spouse. For many assets (such as house, car, joint investments, etc.), this may need to be done after your divorce is final. However, you can open your own bank and investment accounts at any time.

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Do you want a Free Initial Consultation with an Estate Planning Lawyer?

Call 1-800-564-2707 today.

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