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Boulder Garfield County UT estate planning young adults

Estate Planning - How to Preserve Your Wealth

estate planning elder law

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I had a potential client call me earlier in the week asking me if he needed a will. The caller wasn't married and had no children or grandchildren. He didn't own any real property. All of his bank accounts had payable on death beneficiaries and he owned minimal personal property. He had the perfect plan; nothing was going to pass through probate so he didn't think he needed a will.

Maybe he doesn't need a will. I didn't know exactly since self-help estate planning frequently leads to mistakes or property that doesn't have the proper designations. In this situation a will is prophylactic. It ensures that if a mistake is made or a beneficiary designation fails, that property passes to the intended recipient.

I turned the discussion from planning for death to what type of planning he had for his life. I asked if he had a power of attorney for finances. His answer was no. "Do you have an advanced health care directive (aka health care power of attorney)?" "No."

The lack of such planning concerned me since I knew he didn't have a significant other or children to care for him if he were unable to care for himself. What would happen to him if he had a stroke or suffered from dementia or Alzheimer's? Perhaps his siblings would step in to care for him - but how? They would have to spend his money to set up a conservatorship and guardianship or other court proceedings. These processes take time and money to set up and are expensive to administer.

To help deal with his finances he could execute a springing power of attorney for finances that would give a sibling or trusted relative the ability to manage his finances if he became incapacitated and unable to do so. It's called a springing power of attorney because it only becomes effective upon incapacity. The power of attorney can provide broad powers and sets forth detailed instructions concerning what the designated agent can and cannot do on the individual's behalf. More importantly, it would allow the caller to designate who he wanted to manage his finances - not a judge. Drafting and executing a power of attorney in this situation is relatively inexpensive when compared to the cost of setting up and maintaining a conservatorship.

In Oregon, an advance health care directive would assist the caller by designating a health care agent to make health care decisions on his behalf when he's unable to. It would potentially eliminate the need for guardianship proceedings. The representative can make decisions based on directions that are left in the directive. Among the decisions the representative can make is whether to withhold or remove life support, food or hydration. The advance heath care directive does not authorize euthanasia, assisted suicide or any overt action to end the person's life.

This example is a part of the problem with self-help planning. Although the caller was very thorough with his death planning he didn't give any thought to his life. In this caller's case, life planning was much more important than death planning, but he hadn't given it any thought.

Give us a call if you need additional information or to prepare your estate plan.

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Boulder Utah 9 estate planning pitfalls to avoid

Estate Planning - Major Aspects of Personal Finance Management

why is estate planning important

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To many, estate planning may seem like a process that only the rich have to deal with. You may believe that unless you have a large amount of money, property, or land, you do not have an "estate". In fact, anyone who has anything to his or her name, whether it is a car, a house, land, bank account, or merely a few heirloom possessions, has an estate. Estate planning is designed to give you the chance to have your property and possessions passed on to the people that you wish to have them, instead of leaving the decision up to the state. Without planning, your property could possibly be passed on to certain people or in a certain way that you do not approve of.

Don't Let the Courts Control Your Estate

Creating a will through estate planning allows you to communicate your wishes to your family even after you are gone. A will is a legal document that specifies who you would like to leave your property to. These people are your beneficiaries. It also allows you to specify how you would like your property to be passed on. Perhaps you always expected that you would give your house to your daughter, who lives close by. Or maybe you intend to pass on your treasured tools and garage equipment to your nephew who is a mechanic. You may have already made promises to loved ones to pass on some of your treasured belongings once you pass away.

While you may have made promises to relatives or communicated all of your intentions to your spouse or children, without a will your words of intent will not carry any weight. When you pass away with no will, the court will divide your property according to state intestacy laws. This means that your property may be divided among your spouse, children, and other family members without any regard for your specific wishes, because there was no written proof of what you wanted. It may just be a major misunderstanding on your part, but to the loved ones to whom you made promises, it may seem like scorn and betrayal. They may be left behind thinking that you didn't care enough about them to take the time to write a will.

How a Probate Lawyer Can Help

Don't let your promises and intentions to your family go unfulfilled. Consider talking to a probate lawyer about how you can draft a valid will and protect your estate and personal wishes. A probate lawyer can walk you through the process of drafting a will, creating trusts, taking care of outstanding debts, dealing with greedy or disagreeable relatives, and more. An experienced probate lawyer can serve as your legal advisor to ensure that your intentions are communicated properly and that your property is passed on according to your wishes.

For More Information

To learn more about estate planning and protecting your property from state intestacy, please visit us or give us a call today.

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Bluffdale Utah County UT estate planning 5 year lookback

Estate Planning Overview, 101

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An estate plan is a document consisting of multiple trivial elements such as the living will or healthcare proxy or also known as medical power of attorney and assignment of power of attorney. Some people also include trust into their wills. Once you merge all these things together, you have to get it certified under the legal laws of both the federal and state governments. Basically everyone needs to have a will, to inform the world where you wish to allocate your assets to after you leave the world. In fact, it is the best way to consign guardians for your children.

Those dying without a proper estate planning, having no will to display upon their deaths are known to be dying intestate. However, this implies that your heirs need to struggle through several legal procedures in order to take over the assets. Having a trust does not guarantee the ownership transfer; it is insufficient because you still need a will to be in charge of your trust to inherit them to your beneficiaries. In addition, it is advisable that you discuss the plan with your children to avoid future discord, especially if you know your heirs may come in strong disagreement with one another.

To begin with your estate plan, you have to garner all appropriate information such as insurance policies, investments, real estate or business interests, financial condition, and any retirement savings. Then ponder to yourself several questions like who you wish to assign to the job of handling your financial affairs if you happen to be incapacitated. Then consider whom you intend to inherit your assets to and give thoughts into plotting the responsibility of your medical decisions should you be bedridden and unconscious.

Some people think that having infinite amount of money indicates a good estate planning but this is not always the case. Leaving all your properties and cash to your spouse does not imply it will be exempted from estate tax because you will instead increase his or her taxable estate. Subsequently, if your spouse leaves the money to your children upon his or her death, they will end up paying higher estate taxes. At all cases, having a will is the best item to solve all hassles.

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Bluffdale Utah estate planning lawyer

Estate Planning - The Benefits of Peace of Mind

estate planning for dummies

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An estate plan is a document consisting of multiple trivial elements such as the living will or healthcare proxy or also known as medical power of attorney and assignment of power of attorney. Some people also include trust into their wills. Once you merge all these things together, you have to get it certified under the legal laws of both the federal and state governments. Basically everyone needs to have a will, to inform the world where you wish to allocate your assets to after you leave the world. In fact, it is the best way to consign guardians for your children.

Those dying without a proper estate planning, having no will to display upon their deaths are known to be dying intestate. However, this implies that your heirs need to struggle through several legal procedures in order to take over the assets. Having a trust does not guarantee the ownership transfer; it is insufficient because you still need a will to be in charge of your trust to inherit them to your beneficiaries. In addition, it is advisable that you discuss the plan with your children to avoid future discord, especially if you know your heirs may come in strong disagreement with one another.

To begin with your estate plan, you have to garner all appropriate information such as insurance policies, investments, real estate or business interests, financial condition, and any retirement savings. Then ponder to yourself several questions like who you wish to assign to the job of handling your financial affairs if you happen to be incapacitated. Then consider whom you intend to inherit your assets to and give thoughts into plotting the responsibility of your medical decisions should you be bedridden and unconscious.

Some people think that having infinite amount of money indicates a good estate planning but this is not always the case. Leaving all your properties and cash to your spouse does not imply it will be exempted from estate tax because you will instead increase his or her taxable estate. Subsequently, if your spouse leaves the money to your children upon his or her death, they will end up paying higher estate taxes. At all cases, having a will is the best item to solve all hassles.

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Bluffdale Salt Lake County UT subchapter s estate planning

Estate Planning - Major Aspects of Personal Finance Management

estate planning for dummies

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In my estate planning practice, it is not uncommon to meet with a new client who wants an estate plan prepared, but is a bit vague as to what should be included in that plan. Quite frequently, the initial conversation begins with the client saying something like, "I would like a will... or should I have a trust? Do I need anything else?" Actually, those are good questions to begin a discussion.

Most folks recognize that their estate plan should provide for the distribution of their assets upon their death. That, of course, is an essential element of an estate plan, but there is more to consider in a well-designed plan. Prior to meeting with your attorney for the first time you should also be thinking about such things as who you want to handle your affairs should you become incapacitated; whether you would want your doctor to keep you alive should you be near the point of death with little chance of recovery; who you want to have the authority to sign important legal papers for you if you are unavailable; and, who you would want to raise your children if you suddenly die. There is a wide variety of personal circumstances which impact estate planning, but let me offer the following as items you should consider even before you meet with a lawyer to discuss your own estate plan.

Should I have a will or a trust?

This is typically among the first questions posed by clients during an initial meeting. Many are aware that a trust will avoid probate, but that is true only if the trust is properly funded, meaning that all of their assets are transferred into the trust. Not every estate plan needs a trust, however, and it may not be necessary for you to incur the additional cost of having your lawyer prepare a trust, when a will is suitable for your needs. And, contrary to what some folks think, having a trust does not avoid estate taxes.

A trust may be the right choice for you, if it is unlikely that you will acquire more assets in the years ahead. What can often happen, however, is that folks will have a trust established and thereafter acquire new assets that they neglect to place in the trust. Then when they die the assets outside of the trust have to go through probate which defeats the intent of establishing a trust in the first place. So, before deciding upon a trust as the main element of your own estate plan, take some time to consider your future investment plans and major acquisitions.

There are some other advantages to a trust, which might make it the right choice for you. For example, should you become incapacitated, your trustee will be able to step in and manage your assets without having to seek a court appointed conservator. In that sense, a trust document is more all-encompassing and flexible than an ordinary will.

What else should I consider in my estate plan?

Estate planning isn't just about deciding who gets your wealth when you die. It is also about making decisions as to what you want to happen should you become seriously ill or incapacitated.

Every estate plan should include an advance directive, which used to be called a living will. This document allows you to appoint a health care representative to make health care decisions for you, including end of life decisions, when you are unable to do so.

Similarly, we recommend that you give a durable power of attorney to a family member or trusted friend in order to allow your appointed agent to manage your financial and business affairs when you are unavailable or otherwise incapacitated. A durable power of attorney remains in effect so long as you are alive and should provide that it will be effective even in the event of your incapacity.

What about my bank accounts, life insurance and investment accounts?

Careful estate planning should include a review of all of your assets, including checking the beneficiary designations you have listed in your retirement plan and in regard to your investment and bank accounts. With such beneficiary designations, these assets will be transferred outside of the probate process to those persons you have previously designated as beneficiaries on these accounts. It is important that you review your beneficiary designations to ensure that your choice of beneficiaries is in accordance with your current intentions as to disposition of your estate.

A thorough review of your portfolio and consideration of the issues described above before meeting with your estate planning attorney will allow you to realize the maximum benefit from your meeting. It will also help your attorney to focus his or her discussion with you on aspects of the process that are most relevant to your goals and needs.

© Call today for your free initial consultation.

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Blanding San Juan County UT estate planning 2nd marriage

Estate Planning: Fun For The Entire Family

estate planning seminar

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There are numerous estate planning issues that arise during a separation or divorce. If you're considering divorce, make sure you've adequately addressed these issues and avoid significant consequences.

The first issue is to immediately revoke any powers of attorney that grant your spouse powers over your health care or financial decisions. If you do not revoke these powers of attorney, your ex-spouse will remain your agent despite your divorce. Just imagine your ex-spouse making your health care decisions or continuing to have access to your financial accounts even after your divorce.

If you do not have a health care power of attorney or financial power of attorney, or after you revoke your existing power of attorney, you should create a new one. You may do this before, during, or after your divorce. If your divorce is pending, you probably do not want your soon to be ex-spouse having any type of decision making power over you or your assets. However, if you do not appoint someone else, your spouse will likely serve as the "default" agent if one is needed.

The next thing to consider is your Will. If you already have a Will, revise it. Chances are that your current Will provides for everything to go to your spouse. Once your divorce is final, any bequests to your spouse are nullified. Still, if you do not change your Will, such bequests will be granted if you die before your divorce is final. You cannot completely disinherit your spouse through a Will because State law provides for minimum amounts to a spouse, which is called "taking against the Will". Still you can limit what your spouse receives to the statutory amounts.

Also, there is a good chance that your spouse is named as your Personal Representative (or Executor). Even after your divorce is final, this designation will remain valid. Finally, any bequests made to in-laws will remain valid despite your divorce. Often there is a provision in Wills that provides that in the event your spouse does not survive you and there are no other beneficiaries under your Will, your assets are divided evenly between your heirs at law and your spouse's heirs at law. So, you may have a bequest to your in-laws and not even realize it.

You may also want to consider appointing a guardian for any minor children. In almost all cases, your spouse will continue to have parental rights and will receive full custody of your children upon your death. However, if there is a valid reason, such as abuse or drug addiction, why your spouse should not receive custody you should identify those reasons in your Will and name the person(s) you wish to have custody. Also, if your ex-spouse predeceases you, your Will should control who receives custody.

Also, you should establish a trust through your Will (called a testamentary trust) to control assets left to minor or disabled children. That way, you can decide who makes the decisions over those assets until your children are old enough to receive them outright. If you do not establish a trust and appoint a trustee, your ex-spouse will likely have control over any assets left to your children. And, although the assets are supposed to be used for the children's benefit, there is no practical way of controlling or checking that that is what really happens.

You should also consider a Revocable Trust. If you have one already, revise it to remove powers and gifts given to ex-spouse. Unlike a Will, any gifts given to an ex-spouse through a trust remain valid despite your divorce. Likewise, if your spouse is named as your successor trustee, that appointment remains valid despite your divorce.

There is also a benefit to having a Revocable Trust rather than a Will. In some states, you can completely disinherit a spouse through a revocable trust. The reasoning is that the statutes that grant your spouse a minimum amount of your assets only apply to your probate estate. However, any assets that are placed in trust during your lifetime are not subject to probate. Therefore, if you title all of your individual assets in your trust, you can keep your spouse from receiving anything of yours even if you die before your divorce is final. It can also serve as an ongoing trust after your death to hold assets for your children without your spouse having control or decision making ability.

Additionally, you should review and update any beneficiary designations on life insurance policies, retirement plans, etc. You may not be able to make some of these changes until your divorce is final. For most retirement accounts, your spouse has to sign an authorization for you to appoint someone else as your beneficiary. You may also be prohibited by the court from making changes while your divorce is pending. Just don't forget to make the changes once your divorce is final.

Finally, you should re-title any assets held jointly with your spouse. For many assets (such as house, car, joint investments, etc.), this may need to be done after your divorce is final. However, you can open your own bank and investment accounts at any time.

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Blanding Utah estate planning expert

Estate Planning - It's Just As Much Life As It Is Death Planning

estate planning review

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Estate Planning is not something that everyone wants to think about.  But it's an important thing to consider if you have a significant amount of property or wealth.  Even if you only have a small amount of wealth, you want to make sure that if you pass on, your property goes to the right people in your life.

Without the proper planning this may not happen.  Let's say for example you have no children and have yet to be married.  Let's say also that you spend all of your time working with a children's charity, and that if you did pass on you would want your money to go to this group. 

Without the proper planning, your money could go to your closest surviving family member.  This could be a sister that you don't get along with or a cousin you never knew.  If you know where you want your money to go, then estate planning should be a top priority. 

Nobody likes to think about death.  When you start to think about estate planning, you start to think about how you might die.  It's a sad thing to think about for many people.  But you should try your best to stay strong so that those that you love can get what you would've wanted them to have.

Another way to approach the issue is to do it with an experienced company.  Estate planning companies with experience dealing with this sort of thing can make the process much easier.  They know it's hard to think about these matters, so they make the questioning process as brief as possible for you.  Working with a professional in the field will make the whole process much easier.

You can do some shopping around to find the right company.  Your estate planning choices are some of the most important choices you will have to make in your lifetime.  You want to make sure that you choose the right company to handle them.

It is important to note that the estate planning process doesn't have to take a long time.  You generally know how you would like things to be worked out before you begin the process.  Your estate planner will just help to make your words legally binding, and remind you of issues you might have forgotten.

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Big Water Kane County Utah power estate planning

Estate Planning - How to Preserve Your Wealth

s corp estate planning

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A CONTRACT is defined from the Latin word contractus. An agreement between two or more parties, especially one that is written and enforceable by “law.” To enter into by contract; establish or settle by formal agreement. An agreement between two or more parties which creates obligations to do or not do the specific things that is the subject of that agreement.

OWNERSHIP from the word possessore, is defined as someone who has the legal right to possession with the legal right to transfer possession to others.

ESTATE, (inheritance) patrimonio (possession) a term used in common “law” used to denote the sum total of all possessions by a person at the time of his/hers death.

A TRUST is a CONTRACT. A legal arrangement between two or more persons defining the ownership and distribution of his/hers possessions, under the “law.”

ESTATE PLANNING AND TRUSTS therefore is the written legal agreement (contract) outlining a contractual obligation between the parties.

WHAT IS AN ESTATE TAX?

An ESTATE TAX is a tax on your possessions on the date of your death, up to 55%. Take inventory of what you own: Cash, Savings and checking accounts, CDs, Stocks, Mutual Funds, Bonds, Treasuries, Exempts, Jewelry, Cars, Stamps, Boats, Paintings, and other collectibles, Real Estate ... main home, vacation spot, investment realty, your Business, Interests in other businesses, Limited Partnerships, Partnerships, Mortgages and notes receivable you hold, Retirement plan benefits, IRAs, Amounts that you expect to inherit from others.

Your federal death (estate) tax, up to 55%, is based on the "fair cash value" of your property on the date of your death, not what you originally paid. State probate and death taxes are based on the "location" of your property. Thus, if you own property in different states, each state has to be probated and each will want their fair share.

The only real alternative to a will arrangement is to set up a trust structure during lifetime which, with careful planning, can operate to eradicate these delays, administration costs and taxes as well as giving a large number of additional benefits. For these reasons the use of TRUSTS is increasing dramatically.

The problem is: Many Americans have no plan. They incorrectly assume joint ownership takes care of things, or they believe that their property is not worth enough to be concerned.

Such practices can be shortsighted, cost money, and raise unnecessary and unexpected problems, long time delays, and high administration costs. For one thing, most people have a larger estate than they may realize. For another, joint ownership will not necessarily beat probate hungry lawyers or the estate tax man and will often mean that considerable sums become payable in inheritance tax or estate duty.

A will is not a substitute for a trust. A will does not avoid probate. Many individuals seek to put order to their affairs by making a comprehensive will. Under this arrangement the Executors named in the will would apply for a grant of probate, take possession of the assets of the deceased and then distribute those assets according to the terms of the will.

ITEMS INCLUDED IN YOUR TAXABLE ESTATE:

For example, many people believe the higher exemption amounts that can pass tax free eliminate any need for estate planning. This type of thinking is fundamentally flawed, for example:

1) Certain Types of Property have special rules for estate taxes. Property that spouses jointly own, half the value is included in the estate of the first spouse to die, no matter whose funds bought it or that survivor automatically inherits it. And the full value is counted in survivor's estate could result in a bigger estate tax at that time.

Example: H + W own a private home, fair market value at time of H death is $750,000. 1/2 of $750,000 is included in H's estate; therefore W now owns 100%. On the death of W the full $750,000 would be in her taxable estate; thus, a larger estate tax on the death of W.

2) What the Insurance Man Won't Tell You - Life insurance is taxed in your estate "if" you had any incidental ownership at death. This occurs if you can name new beneficiaries or borrow against policies or take out the cash value. Even insurance you give away, can come back to taxable in your estate if the donor dies and leaves it to you. Group insurance may be included too.

3) Pensions & IRAs - are taxable, except for pensions fixed before 1985.
Then there are several items the law also adds to your estate: Large gifts, non-charitable gifts that exceed $12,000 beginning in 2006 and property partly given away, where you retain the right to use it.

Example: A house that you give to your children but still use rent-free. (Incidentally giving your house to your children creates a problem for them, and for you, if they get sued, or they die before you.)

And stock you give away, but keep voting rights, if in a company that you control. Or the property of others over which you have certain rights such as the power under another's will to name who will get part of that estate. If you could name yourself, your estate or creditors, it's taxable in your estate. Including assets you give a child and keep the right to control.

ESTATE TAX LAWS CAN CHANGE:

Finally, estate tax laws can change. Thirteen times in 25 years, overhauls, tightenings for some, headaches for all. Congress is always tinkering with the idea that they know better than you, where your money should go.

Planning your estate is not an easy task. It takes time and effort. The place to begin is with yourself, your own goals and consideration of your heirs, their ages, abilities, needs and so on at a time when there's no pressure to implement.

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Big Water Utah estate planning in your 30s

Estate Planning - Consider Your Options Before it is Too Late

estate planning 5 year rule

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Here are four key elements of estate planning that can not only help to preserve the value of your estate but also to ensure the efficient administration and disposition of your estate assets.

1. A will is the cornerstone for an estate plan and deals with all matters regarding the final distribution of your estate assets. A will is a legal document that speaks on your behalf upon your demise. If you do not have a will, then the courts will decide the manner in which your estate assets will be distributed - and this may not be in accordance with your wishes.

2. A trust is a legal document that can be designed to address any unique situation that you may have in regard to the distribution of your estate assets. For example, a spendthrift trust can be set up to protect the interests of a beneficiary who is not good at handling money. A trust can be set up for the protection and administration of assets for minor children, a spouse or for any other beneficiary.

Creative use of wills and trusts can not only protect the interests of your heirs, but also can help reduce the impact of taxes and probate fees. An estate planning attorney can help with the proper legal drafting of wills and trusts. But before you engage the services of an attorney, it is highly recommended that you should do the essential ground work first - this will save you hundreds if not thousands of dollars in legal and accounting fees.

3. Your estate executor will need to know the location of your assets and vital documents. If you do not have a proper record of your assets and vital documents, valuable assets can be "lost" during the estate settlement process. For example, there are billions of dollars in unclaimed money currently held by the government waiting to be claimed by the beneficiaries of deceased relatives.

4. It is vitally important to understand that most estates usually comprise of assets that are not readily convertible into cash. For example, real estate, long term financial investments, business interests, rental properties and other assets. In other words, most estate assets are generally illiquid.

Without proper funding arrangements it is highly probable that valuable estate assets may have to be liquidated at fire sale prices in order to pay taxes and other estate settlement expenses. These expenses can easily amount to thousands and even millions of dollars in the case of larger estates. There is a smart way to fund estate settlement expenses without having to liquidate valuable estate assets by the creative use of life insurance.

By implementing the above estate planning strategies you can ensure that all your affairs are properly organized and depending on the size of your estate, you could potentially save thousands if not millions of dollars. Your heirs will be proud and glad that you made all the proper arrangements and that all your affairs were left in excellent order. To learn more on estate planning please check the resource box below.

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Bicknell Wayne County Utah estate planning tax deductible

Estate Planning - Consider Your Options Before it is Too Late

estate planning house

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Here are four key elements of estate planning that can not only help to preserve the value of your estate but also to ensure the efficient administration and disposition of your estate assets.

1. A will is the cornerstone for an estate plan and deals with all matters regarding the final distribution of your estate assets. A will is a legal document that speaks on your behalf upon your demise. If you do not have a will, then the courts will decide the manner in which your estate assets will be distributed - and this may not be in accordance with your wishes.

2. A trust is a legal document that can be designed to address any unique situation that you may have in regard to the distribution of your estate assets. For example, a spendthrift trust can be set up to protect the interests of a beneficiary who is not good at handling money. A trust can be set up for the protection and administration of assets for minor children, a spouse or for any other beneficiary.

Creative use of wills and trusts can not only protect the interests of your heirs, but also can help reduce the impact of taxes and probate fees. An estate planning attorney can help with the proper legal drafting of wills and trusts. But before you engage the services of an attorney, it is highly recommended that you should do the essential ground work first - this will save you hundreds if not thousands of dollars in legal and accounting fees.

3. Your estate executor will need to know the location of your assets and vital documents. If you do not have a proper record of your assets and vital documents, valuable assets can be "lost" during the estate settlement process. For example, there are billions of dollars in unclaimed money currently held by the government waiting to be claimed by the beneficiaries of deceased relatives.

4. It is vitally important to understand that most estates usually comprise of assets that are not readily convertible into cash. For example, real estate, long term financial investments, business interests, rental properties and other assets. In other words, most estate assets are generally illiquid.

Without proper funding arrangements it is highly probable that valuable estate assets may have to be liquidated at fire sale prices in order to pay taxes and other estate settlement expenses. These expenses can easily amount to thousands and even millions of dollars in the case of larger estates. There is a smart way to fund estate settlement expenses without having to liquidate valuable estate assets by the creative use of life insurance.

By implementing the above estate planning strategies you can ensure that all your affairs are properly organized and depending on the size of your estate, you could potentially save thousands if not millions of dollars. Your heirs will be proud and glad that you made all the proper arrangements and that all your affairs were left in excellent order. To learn more on estate planning please check the resource box below.

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